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Home > Directory > Heritage & Museums > Queen Victoria Market

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Queen Victoria Market

Address:  Visitor Centre, 69 Victoria St
Melbourne, VIC, Australia
3000 
Queen Victoria Market

Queen Victoria Market

   
Contact Person: Katie James
   
Telephone: 03 9320 5822
Remember to mention you saw us on schoolresources.com.au.
   
Email: Click to Contact  
     
Website: http://www.qvm.com.au  
     
Postal Address :
Market Office, 513 Elizabeth St
     
Postal Address Suburb :
Melbourne
     
Post Code :
3000
     
2nd Contact Person :
Natasa Filosoglou
     
Appropriate age group :
prep - university
     
Special Offers :
School groups get special rates
     
Full Comprehensive Description :

Product and Price List 2010

Foodies Tour

Enjoy all the colour and excitement of the real Queen Victoria Market on a two hour walk through the market with an experienced guide.  The Foodies Tour will allow you to discover a world of new tastes and flavours as you tantalise your tastebuds sampling the finest produce in Melbourne whilst developing an historic understanding of the markets beginnings and it’s cultural and heritage links.

Retail: $35.00 incl. GST includes generous food tasting and historical background ($30.00 incl GST for 10 or more people).
Group size max 75  people (in groups of 15 or max of 10 on Sat)
Minimum 10 people for private groups

Probus Clubs: $25.00 incl. GST
Includes generous food tasting and historical background.
Group size max 80 people (in groups of 15 or 10 on Sat)
Minimum 10 people for private tours.

School Groups: $19.00 incl. GST
1.5 Hour duration
Incl. food samplings and a juice
(Teachers free of charge)

Primary School Groups: $14.50 incl. GST includes juice and 2 food samplings or a pastry
1hr duration
(Teachers Free of Charge)
 or
$12 per person
1hr duration
includes a juice
(Teachers Free of Charge)


Available: .Tuesday, Thursday. Friday & Saturday
Times: 10.00 – 12.00 a two-hour tour
(Any other two-hour block in the morning can be accommodated within Market hours)

 
Heritage Market Tour

Relive 125 years of colourful history and enjoy the spectacle of the Heritage Market Tour, which takes you on a journey throughout the full market precinct.  Learn secrets about the past life of the Market and discover how the changing face of Melbourne was reflected in the produce sold at the Market.  An intriguing insight into Melbourne’s soul.

Retail: $19 incl. GST Includes tea/coffee and a French pastry
Group size min 10 people, max 60 people
(in groups of 15 max, 10max  on Sat).

Available.  Tuesday, Thursday. Friday & Saturday
Times:   10.30 – 12.00 a 1.5 tour
(Any other 1.5 hour block in the morning can be accommodated within Market hours)


Combination Tour

As the name suggests this tour encompasses the vibrant history of the Heritage tour accompanied by a small sample of some of the scrumptious delicies found on our Foodies tour.
The combination tour lasts for approximately 2 hours inclusive of a morning tea which consists of a French pastry and a tea/coffee.

Cost: $30.00pp (inclusive of 10% GST)

Please note that the Heritage and Combination tours are only available for group bookings. Minimum of 10 people for private group bookings.

All tours depart from The Queen Victoria Market Walking Tours Centre located at 69 Victoria Street Melbourne (cnr Elizabeth St.)


Shop’n’Cook Tour:

Discover the finest produce the Queen Victoria Market has to offer and then whisk back to the Cooking School for the ultimate cooking class. Queen Victoria Market is the one place that knows all about tastes and flavours!
 
Duration:
2.5hrs (1 hr tour and 1.5hr cooking class)
 
Group maximum, 18 people per class; although groups of up to 36 can be accommodated. Classes take on a demonstration based format.

Cost:
School Groups: $50 + GST per head (primary and secondary school only)
Adults: price available on request

*Shop & Cook available on market days only. 
*Cooking School available seven days a week.

Market Trading Hours

Monday – CLOSED
Tuesday 6.00am – 2.00pm
Wednesday – CLOSED
Thursday 6.00am – 2.00pm
Friday 6.00am – 6.00pm
Saturday 6.00am – 3.00pm
Sunday 9.00am – 4.00pm (limited food trading)

SITE

The Queen Victoria Market is situated on a seven-hectare site, a little over one kilometre northwest of the Melbourne Town Hall. It comprises two blocks – six hectares bounded by Victoria, Queen, Peel and Franklin Streets and a second smaller one-hectare allotment bounded by Elizabeth, Victoria, Queen and Therry Streets.


HISTORY

The Queen Victoria Market has been developed, redeveloped and operated by the Melbourne City Council for 125 years. The Council has been associated with markets of all kinds since 1841 when it opened the Western Market where the National Mutual Centre now stands at the corner of Collins and Market Streets. Other markets developed by the Council include the Eastern Market (the site of the former Southern Cross Hotel), the Melbourne Wholesale Fruit and Vegetable Market, Newmarket Saleyards, the Melbourne Wholesale Fish Market and the Queen Victoria Market. Only the last two are still owned by the Council.

While all Markets have changed and expanded to cater for modern needs, the Queen Victoria Market has remained essentially intact, both in the services it provides to the people of Victoria and as an historical landmark. Stalls are still paid for by the traders on a daily basis and merchandise is removed from the stalls at the end of each trading day. Some families have stood in the Queen Victoria Market for generations. It is the buildings and the development of the Queen Victoria Market, which tell a story in themselves and may not appear obvious to the shopper. Here is a brief story of the Market’s evolution.

 
Laneway between A and B sheds.
Photo circa 1929


THE LOWER MARKET

The Lower Market lies to the east of Queen Street and contains the present Meat and Dairy Halls. The land was set aside in 1857 for use as a vegetable market but wasn’t well used until 1868 when a substantial brick building was erected. This building still stands as part of the present Meat Hall. In 1884 the present Meat Hall facade was erected after a realignment of Elizabeth Street. The Meat Hall was refurbished in 1982 and was extended to Queen Street. The hall extensions were carried out in identical style to the original building. If you stand in the Food Court and look back along the northern wall of the meat hall, it is possible to see where the building was extended by the colour of the light bricks in the arches.

Other buildings in the lower market include the two storey shops on Victoria and Elizabeth Streets, erected in 1884 and 1887, H and I shed, erected in 1878 and the Dairy Produce Hall, erected in 1929 which replaced part of the old H and I sheds.

The Lower Market lies to the east of Queen Street and contains the present Meat and Dairy Halls. The land was set aside in 1857 for use as a vegetable market but wasn’t well used until 1868 when a substantial brick building was erected. This building still stands as part of the present Meat Hall. In 1884 the present Meat Hall facade was erected after a realignment of Elizabeth Street. The Meat Hall was refurbished in 1982 and was extended to Queen Street. The hall extensions were carried out in identical style to the original building. If you stand in the Food Court and look back along the northern wall of the meat hall, it is possible to see where the building was extended by the colour of the light bricks in the arches. Other buildings in the lower market include the two storey shops on Victoria and Elizabeth Streets, erected in 1884 and 1887, H and I shed, erected in 1878 and the Dairy Produce Hall, erected in 1929 which replaced part of the old H and I sheds.

THE UPPER MARKET

This area is sometimes referred to as the ‘main market’ and was developed in two main stages. The land was not originally reserved for market purposes but a range of uses, the predominant one being a cemetery. Most of the upper market was developed in 1877/78 with the construction of sheds A to F, which still stand today. These are located between Victoria Street and F shed. This site was the first to be developed, as it was the least used of the cemetery area which extended to Franklin Street. The single storey shops in Victoria Street were built in 1884 and 1890 and were refurbished in 1987 and their verandahs restored. New and interesting retail uses now occupy these premises.

The second stage in the development of the upper market was conceived as early as 1905 when the need to accommodate the Wholesale Market by extending the site to Franklin Street was recognised. This part of the old cemetery was more heavily used than the northern part of the Market and the decision to expand onto this area took much longer. After considerable debate and examination of alternative sites a Royal Commission of 1915 found that the Market should expand onto the old cemetery site. In 1917 the necessary legislation was in place.

Human remains were exhumed from this area and reinterred at various cemeteries. This commenced in 1920 and proceeded over the following two years. At Fawkner Cemetery many of the memorials were also re-erected in a special area known as the ‘Old Pioneers Section’. The City of Melbourne has since continued to pay for maintenance of the site. Other uses that were relocated include a school building and an army hall.

In 1922/23 much construction was going on including the extension of the sheds to Peel and Queen Streets and the construction of the large K and L sheds. In 1929/30 the Council built 60 brick stores for accommodation of the agents and dealers. These buildings were erected on the existing car park area and a single row of buildings on Franklin Street is all that remains of the complex.

In 1969, the wholesale growers, agents and dealers were moved out to the Melbourne Wholesale Fruit and Vegetable Market in Footscray Road, after which came a proposal to substantially redevelop the Queen Victoria Market site. Public pressure and a realization of the value of the Market as an historic facility eventually led to the retention of the Market and a substantial refurbishment program, which continues today.

Markets are still popular and can be found in many of Melbourne’s district centres. Some have been roofed in and open stalls replaced with lock up shops. Only the Queen Victoria Market remains intact, still relying on customer patronage as it has over the last 125 years.

SHOPPING

Shopping at the Queen Victoria Market is an education in itself. Not only does this hive of activity offer an insight into a way of life far removed from the routine of 9-5. It also provides an opportunity to procure interesting and exotic fruits and vegetables, sample
international cuisine and culinary delights, the like of which are not available at the local supermarket.

The Meat, Fish and Rabbit area has a wide selection of quality meats as well as a veritable smorgasbord of seafood, including crayfish, prawns and a variety of other shellfish, fresh water and ocean fish.

Adjacent to the Meat section is the Dairy Produce area. This gourmets’ paradise with its 38 delicatessens offers everything from pate to caviar, salami to sausages, rabbit to kangaroo, and has one of the most extensive ranges of local and imported cheeses in Melbourne.

For those who prefer the sweeter things in life, this section also offers a variety of mouth-watering handmade chocolates and continental cakes and pastries.

It is the open stands, however, that holds the real fascination for many of the markets’ patrons. The vibrant, cosmopolitan atmosphere, which flourishes here, has endeared the market to much of Melbourne for the last 13 years. Renowned in the past for its almost endless variety of fruit and vegetables, it has also earned a reputation for an impressive array of general wares. Here, one might find anything from jewellery and fashion accessories to manchester or hardware, from fresh flowers and indoor plants to compact discs and cassettes. The list is almost endless.

With 32 square metres of organic produce available, the Queen Victoria Market has the largest supply of organic fruit and vegetables under one roof.

The Market also has a large range of eggs from free range to organic. For those requiring a little bit extra from their fresh produce, this is the place to be.

Those who don’t want to buy can be entertained by buskers who perform on the surround of the Market or simply by the infinite variety of people that the Market attracts. The stallholders too, are performers in their own right, each peddling their wares with their own style and flare.

The Queen Victoria Market is a thriving and vital place pulsating with life. The friendly competition between stallholders and the concern for people, which persists here, is what gives the market its Old World charm and the addictive power to draw millions of visitors each year. Visitors who come not only to buy, but also to relish the atmosphere surrounding this historic site.



Above: Deli Traders.
Photo circa 1926


GASLIGHT NIGHT MARKET

From the last Wednesday in November until February, the Gaslight Night Market caters for those wanting something just a little bit different to do on a Wednesday evening. From 5.30pm until 10pm, the Market comes alive with arts and crafts from all around the world, tarot and crystal ball readers, mexican hammocks – anything that is a little bit different.

Once you’ve eaten from one of the international food stalls and tried the regional wines you can take a ride on a camel, listen to the band or watch one of the street performers.

The is one place where you can find something for everyone!

The Night Market is also the latest place to have a party. We can organise a cordoned off area with its own bar and coupons for food!


COOKING SCHOOL

The Queen Victoria Market acknowledged both locally and internationally as Australia’s
premier fresh food market has opened it’s own Cooking School.

This School features some of Melbourne’s famous chefs, together with new and exciting young chefs, giving you great ideas and great recipes.

The Chef Kitchen Queen Victoria Market Cooking School offers a great variety of courses, class times and session prices.


TOURS

Learn secrets about the Market’s near and distant history – as a wholesale and retail market and as Melbourne’s first General Cemetery. Understand the cultural history and international influence on the types of produce and products available at the Market.

The Heritage Tour gives you an intriguing insight into the Market’s soul. Including morning tea, this tour costs $19. 80 and leaves at 10.30am.

The generous samplings of food on the Foodies Dream Tour will tantalize your taste buds and open up the world of Australian produce. This tour delivers an amazing insight into the Market’s huge array of food and provides excellent tips and techniques of food selection and quality market shopping. The Foodies Dream tour costs $25 and leaves at 10am. Bookings are required for both tours, which are conducted each Market day except Sunday. Prices quoted include 10% GST.


TROLLEY HIRE

Located at the northeastern corner of the car park, trolleys can be hired for $5.00 with a $2.00 refund when the trolley is returned.


GETTING THERE

The Queen Victoria Market Carpark, located at the southern end of the Market site, provides off street parking for shoppers who are prepared to drive. For those who prefer to take public transport, trams run along Victoria, Peel and Elizabeth Streets at regular intervals. Trains on the underground loop also stop at nearby Flagstaff and Melbourne Central (formerly Museum) Stations.


CARPARK

Market days

$4.00 for the first 2 hours, $3.00 per hour or part thereafter.

The maximum daily rate is $25.00.


Non-Market Days (Monday & Wednesdays Only)

0 - 1 Hour

$1.00

1 - 2 Hours $4.00
2 - 3 Hours $6.00

3 - 4 Hours

$7.00

> 4 Hours 

$8.00

The maximum daily rate is $8.00.

FREE parking is available:-

* Tuesdays, Thursdays & Fridays before 10am.  Enter and Exit the car park before 10am and your parking is free (From Tuesday 14 April 2009)

* Fridays after 4pm.  Enter the car park after 4pm and exit before 7pm and your parking is free.

Any cars left after closing hours will incur an additional $30.00 exit fee.  To exit, contact Security.

Lost tickets will incur the maximum fee.

**** NEW PARKING RATES EFFECTIVE TUESDAY 2 FEBRUARY 2010 ****

0 - 2 Hours:  $5.00
$3.00 per hour or part thereof thereafter
Maximum $25 per day

     

This listing is in the following categories: Heritage & Museums, Culture, Health & Nutrition in Schools,

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